NAIS Threatens Rare Breeds
     
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2006 ARKANSAS COOPERATIVE AGREEMENT WITH USDA

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Organic & Grassfed Growers Also Affected

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USDA/APHIS NAIS DOCUMENTS

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"CREATIVE" SIGN-UPS BY THE GOVERNMENT

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NAIS Threatens Rare Breeds

RFID Tags - Good, Bad & Ugly

R-CALF USA Fights NAIS

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SCRAPIE ID for Goats/Sheep & the NAIS

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The PLUM ISLAND CONNECTION

The Plan is AGENDA 21

4-H, FFA Targeted at Fairs

MICROCHIPS Cause CANCER

Leon's Story - Chipped Dog Died From Cancer

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NAIS NEWS in OTHER STATES

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CONTACT GENERAL ASSEMBLY MEMBERS FOR ARKANSAS

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USDA, INCORPORATED

ECONOMIC IMPACT ON HORSE OWNERS

 

THE NAIS THREATENS THE FUTURE EXISTANCE OF RARE BREEDS OF ANIMALS. RARE BREED ORGANIZATIONS SUCH AS THE AMERCIAN LIVESTOCK BREEDS CONSERVANCY ARE TAKING STANDS AGAINST THE NAIS FOR THIS REASON.


 

 http://albc-usa.org/news/jun1_06.html

June 1, 2006

American Livestock Breeds Conservancy
Statement of Concern
National Animal Identification System Proposal

The American Livestock Breeds Conservancy (ALBC) would like to take this opportunity to respond to the U.S. Department of Agriculture’s invitation to provide input on the emerging proposal relating to development of a National Animal Identification System (NAIS). The mission of the ALBC is, among other things, to protect the richness of genetic resources found in American livestock and poultry. It is recognized by the scientific and agricultural communities that much of the wealth of genetic diversity of America’s purebred flocks and herds resides in rare, endangered, and heritage breeds. The future health of the American livestock industry may well depend on being able to tap and utilize the genetic potential inherent in these animals. ALBC strongly urges all decision makers involved with developing the policies and procedures of the NAIS to pay careful attention to the effects their actions may have on the maintenance of this vital genetic resource.

For a variety of reasons, many of our country’s rare, endangered and heritage breeds of livestock and poultry are stewarded and maintained on small, independent farms and ranches. Thus, any regulations, policies or procedures that may prove sufficiently onerous or cumbersome will discourage a significant number of those farmers and ranchers currently breeding or contemplating raising such animals. The NAIS program could have serious, unintended, and unanticipated effects on the long-term viability of our nation’s livestock industry.

ALBC appreciates that some benefits can accrue from the development of a carefully considered national system of animal identification. However, as the only national organization concerned with the conservation of our nation’s livestock and poultry, we urge all NAIS decision and policy makers to be aware of the importance of conserving our national livestock genetic legacy and to be mindful that regulations and procedures designed specifically for agribusiness and large-scale production systems may have disproportionate impact on those currently maintaining these genetic resources.

Policies, procedures, and regulations that inappropriately or unnecessarily discourage farmers and ranchers from considering or continuing to steward rare, endangered, or heritage agricultural animals could lead to the extinction or functional loss of the genetic resource these creatures represent. Such a loss would diminish our country’s genetic legacy, significantly reduce the capacity of present and future animal breeders to respond to new challenges and opportunities, and potentially compromise our nation’s food security.

ALBC stands ready to have dialogue with those charged in development of NAIS to ensure this precious and vulnerable livestock and poultry legacy can be secured.

By taking a public position, ALBC may be able to amend the proposed NAIS and/or its Program Standards such that the adverse impact on breeders and small farmers is eliminated or significantly reduced.

Points of Concern

1. NAIS creates an unfair economic and administrative burden for breeders and small farmer while providing little or no benefit.

2. While the NAIS trace back system does have some merit, clearly the enhanced export markets provide no benefit to breeders and small farmers.

3. The onerous record keeping and procedures of NAIS discourage present and future breeders and small farmers, and thus adverse impact to the conservation of rare breeds of livestock and poultry is anticipated.

4. NAIS has moved into reality too quickly for fair appraisal, comment, or design.

5. No evaluation of cost to benefit has been undertaken.

Board of Directors,
American Livestock Breeds Conservancy

The American Livestock Breeds Conservancy
P.O. Box 477
Pittsboro, NC 27312
(919) 542-5704
editor@albc-usa.org
www.albc-usa.org

THE AMERICAN LIVESTOCK BREEDS CONSERVANCY, founded in 1977, is a non-profit membership organization working to protect over 150 breeds of cattle, goats, horses, asses, sheep, pigs, rabbits and poultry from extinction. It is the pioneer organization in the U.S. working to conserve heritage breeds and genetic diversity in livestock.

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IF THE NAIS IS IMPLEMENTED, BREED EXTINCTION WILL EXPLODE AS SMALL FARMERS ARE FORCED OUT AND CORPORATE CAFO FARMS USING COMMON HYBRID ANIMALS ARE ALL THAT ARE LEFT.

http://news.yahoo.com/s/ap/20070904/ap_on_sc/un_rare_livestock;_ylt=Au75OUqnxriw8k1QniLZue4iANEA

LIVESTOCK BREED EXTINCTION CONCERNS U.N.
Tue Sep 4, 4:08 PM ET

The rate at which livestock breeds are disappearing is "alarming," a senior official at the U.N. Food and Agriculture Organization said Tuesday, warning that precious genes could be lost forever.

One rare breed is becoming extinct every month because farmers - particularly in Asia and Africa - are importing high-yield animals such as Holstein-Friesian cows and White Leghorn chickens, the agency's Assistant Director-General Alexander Mueller told an intergovernmental livestock conference.

As a result, unique genetic material that could protect farm animals from future threats posed by disease and climate change might disappear, he said. "In this situation, the world cannot simply take a business-as-usual, wait-and-see attitude."

With at least one in five breeds of cattle, goats, pigs, horses and poultry at risk, the U.N. body is urging delegates at the meeting in Interlaken adopt a 10-year rescue plan.

It would involve stepping up monitoring efforts in the developing world, where most of the endangered breeds can be found, and setting up gene banks to preserve vital traits, such as resistance to disease and extreme climate conditions, which have developed over centuries.

Carlos Sere, director-general of the Nairobi, Kenya-based International Livestock Research Institute, said freezing semen, eggs and embryos in liquid nitrogen tanks is an uncomplicated and cheap way of preserving useful genes so they can be reinserted into animal populations when needed.

"In the long run, the benefits of having a genetic insurance are probably going to help developed countries as much as developing countries," Sere told The Associated Press before of the meeting.

Among the breeds the International Livestock Research Institute says are most at risk are the Ankole cattle, whose drought resistance and rich milk made them prized animals in East and Central Africa until the arrival of European dairy cows.

Similarly, the Red Maasai sheep of East Africa, which have developed genetic resistance to a common parasite, have almost disappeared since the introduction of Dorper sheep from South Africa 15 years ago, the research institute says.

Rich countries have already recognized the importance of maintaining a diverse gene pool, the U.N. report says. Farmers in the Swiss canton (state) of Valais are cultivating a breed of cattle known as Evolene Cow, famed for its robustness and fierce nature.

Tamworth pigs, known for their lean meat, have also won favor with breeders in the United States and Britain who want to preserve them for crossbreeding with more common porcine varieties.

An independent expert not attending the conference said that preserving genetic diversity was a prudent step, regardless of whether new diseases or climate change actually affect farming.

"It's so difficult to second guess what the future may hold. Livestock types that may have little value now may have great value in the future for any number of reasons," said Glenn Selk, a professor of animal science at Oklahoma State University.

JOIN US IN THE FIGHT AGAINST THE NAIS AND GIVE IT A REAL GOOD LICKIN'!