FREEDOM TO FARM ACT UPDATES
     
MEMBERSHIP FORM and PETITION

USDA HANDBOOK addresses Farmers as Uneducated

What is DEPOPULATION?

Points For Opposing Animal ID

Export Myths and Fairytales

NASS Survey Information

ARAPA Statement to the Senate Ag Committee

Codex Alimentarius

FORCED NAIS

Sound Science Killing Us

What Can I Do?

2006 ARKANSAS COOPERATIVE AGREEMENT WITH USDA

What are the vets saying?

BREAKING NEWS

Congressmen Speak Out

International Entanglements

What is COOL?

Mad Cow Madness

CONTACT US

By-Laws

2007 ARKANSAS COOPERATIVE AGREEMENT WITH USDA

Important Links

ARKANSAS ANIMAL PRODUCERS ASSOCIATION

Photos From Conway Meeting

FREEDOM TO FARM ACT UPDATES

ALERTS

Corporate Hostile Takeover

What About The Amish?

CONSTITUTION RULES

How do Packers fit in?

The Real Reason for Animal ID

AUSSIE ANIMAL ID IMPACT STUDY

Endangered Property Rights

Organic & Grassfed Growers Also Affected

DATABASES - How Safe Are They?

Wake Up, Farmers!

USDA/APHIS NAIS DOCUMENTS

CAPTIVE ANIMAL FACTORY FARMING

Technology Behind NAIS

AUSSIE RANCHER SPEAKS OUT

NIAA Conference Reports

Pushing Us Off Our Farms

Ag Lawyer Responds to the NAIS

NAIS SUMMARY

INDUSTRIALIZED FARMING

Uncle Sam Wants YOUR Animals!

HORSE TIMELINE FOR NAIS INCLUSION

NAIS DRAFT STRATEGIC PLAN

What is REAL ID?

"CREATIVE" SIGN-UPS BY THE GOVERNMENT

Animal ID Problems in Other Countries

Farm Bureau Connection

NAIS Threatens Rare Breeds

RFID Tags - Good, Bad & Ugly

R-CALF USA Fights NAIS

Retired Army Colonel Rebuts NAIS

Equine Species Working Group Contacts

BRUCE KNIGHT'S SPEECH

INFO ON USDA'S NEW "USER'S GUIDE"

SCRAPIE ID for Goats/Sheep & the NAIS

NAIS ID Terminology

GETTING OUT OF THE NAIS

The PLUM ISLAND CONNECTION

The Plan is AGENDA 21

4-H, FFA Targeted at Fairs

MICROCHIPS Cause CANCER

Leon's Story - Chipped Dog Died From Cancer

TRACKING ROGUE CHICKENS

Protection From Terrorist Livestock

NAIS NEWS in OTHER STATES

Truth about FOOD CONTAMINATION

TRUTH about Foot & Mouth Vaccines

MICROCHIP PROBLEMS IN DUTCH HORSES

What is DELPHI TECHNIQUE

NEW INFORMATION ON EQUINES

2005 ARKANSAS COOPERATIVE AGREEMENT WITH USDA/APHIS

CONTACT GENERAL ASSEMBLY MEMBERS FOR ARKANSAS

Bird Flu Fowl Play

USDA, INCORPORATED

ECONOMIC IMPACT ON HORSE OWNERS

 

HOW AN IDEA BECOMES A LAW: [prepared February 7, 2007]

 

 

The FREEDOM TO FARM ACT began as an idea that was presented in August 2006, to Representative Nathan George, who asked Representative Roy Ragland to sponsor the bill. Representative Ragland had Legislative Research prepare a draft, but decided that the bill was too detailed to garner enough votes for passage. ARAPA then prepared a very short revised bill idea. The draft from Legislative Research was revised and Representative Ragland and ARAPA are now working to get a Senate sponsor and co-sponsors for the bill. When Rep. Ragland determines that enough support has been garnered for passage of the FREEDOM TO FARM ACT, the bill will be filed, given a number, and referred to the Committee on Agriculture, Forestry and Economic Development.  Amendments may be hitched on to the bill. [Let’s hope not.]

 

 

ARAPA members and others will present testimony to the Committee as to why the bill should pass. Others will have an opportunity to present testimony as to why the bill should not pass. The members of the Committee on Agriculture, Forestry and Economic Development will then vote, “do pass,” or, “do not pass.” If the majority vote, “do pass,” the bill will then go to the House floor for a vote. If the Committee majority vote, “do not pass,” the bill is dead.  If the bill passes in the House, it will then go through the same process in the Senate. If it makes it through the Senate Committee on Agriculture, Forestry and Economic Development and the Senate approves the bill, it will then be sent to Governor Beebe for his signature. Once signed it becomes law. Beebe may choose to veto the bill instead of signing it, and it would have to go through the House and Senate voting process again. Once passed, it is no longer a bill but an act and becomes part of Arkansas Code.

 

 

 

 

HOW CAN YOU DETERMINE WHO IS YOUR SENATOR AND REPRESENTATIVE?

 

 

If you are not on the internet, call your County Clerk and find out who is your Senator and Representative and their contact information. If you have internet access, you can determine your Senate District Number and your Representative District Number by going to: http://www.arkansas.gov/senate/senators.php and http://www.state.ar.us/house/reps.php. Maps will indicate your district. This may not have been updated with the name of your current General Assembly member, so after noting your Senate District Number and House District Number, go to http://www.arkleg.state.ar.us. This is the main site for all information about what is happening at the Capitol. You can click on the email for your General Assembly member. Click on their name to secure their mailing address, phone number, committee memberships, and see what bills they are sponsoring. On this site you can read all bills that have been filed and track bills of interest to you as well as view the calendar and agendas for various committees. 

 

 

 

 

COMMITTEE MEETING DECORUM

 

 

Parking at the Capitol is limited. The parking spaces near the Capitol are reserved for elected officials. You can disembark people at the tunnel and then go park. Arriving before 7:45 AM will usually assure that you can park all day in one of the free government building parking lots without difficulty. In front of the Capitol are many metered two-hour parking spaces that are usually available at any time of day. Take plenty of quarters. Enter the Capitol through the tunnel entrance. Elevators will be to your right. The Senate and House Chambers are on the third floor. You can watch Chamber proceedings from the fourth floor.

 

 

Formality is the rule in committee meetings. Gentlemen wear suits and ties and ladies wear pants suits or dresses. Please remove your hats and caps. For safety on the marble steps, sensible shoes should be worn. Cell phones must be turned off or not taken into the meeting rooms. Nothing can be passed out in the meeting room unless approved by the Chairman. If you wish to speak, look for a sign in sheet when you enter the room. You must sign in if you wish to speak. You can always decline to speak if you see that your topic has been covered. You can also release your time to speak to another person. Be brief and to the point. ARAPA members should attend the Committee meeting in force when the Freedom to Farm Act is considered. Meeting rooms are small, so arrive early if you do not want to stand or sit on the floor. Look for an ARAPA member near the door giving out FREEDOM TO FARM STICKERS. We want them to see how much support there is for the FREEDOM TO FARM ACT. Immediately upon completion of the vote on the bill, leave the committee room and gather away from the meeting room door to discuss the outcome. At this time, it would be a good idea to lobby House or Senate members if the bill received a, “do pass.” Flyers supporting FREEDOM TO FARM will be available for you to hand out to General Assembly members. Many General Assembly members use the stairs. When they reach the top, they are often out of breath and ready for an excuse to stand for a few minutes. This is an excellent time to talk to them.

 

 

Senators have offices on the 4th floor and hang out near or in the Senate Chamber. Representatives do not have offices, so they usually hang out in the House Chamber. You can sometimes find them in the basement cafeteria. You are not allowed in either Chamber. If you wish to speak to a certain General Assembly member, there are staffers outside the Chamber doors. Write your message and the name of the General Assembly member on the paper they provide. They will enter the Chamber and contact the General Assembly member, who will come out to visit with you if the Chamber is not in session. By checking the various committee agendas, you can determine exactly where any General Assembly member is who is in a committee meeting. You can usually visit with them as they arrive for a committee meeting or as they leave a committee meeting. You can often schedule an appointment. Many times, you must walk and talk as they move to another location. Be brief and to the point. Lobbying is quite an experience. After about the second week of the session, most members stop wearing their identification tags. Memorizing their picture from the web site or carrying pictures with you makes recognition much easier.

 

 

Smile and keep your message short and simple. Do not get into a confrontation. Keep everything positive.

 

********************************************************************************************

 


              TIPS FOR A PRODUCTIVE MEETING WITH YOUR ELECTED OFFICIAL

 

               DO                         DO NOT

 

* Call and make an  appointment  to  meet       * Do  not  argue, act  aggressive  or get

   with  your  General  Assembly   member.          emotional.

   Arrive about 10 minutes early if meeting        

   in  an office.   Arrive exactly  on time  if        * Do not give an incorrect or untruthful

   meeting in a home.                                            response to a  question.  If you do not

                                                                              know  the  answer,   let   the   General                                                                       

* Invite other people to go with you to the          Assembly   member    know   that   you

  meeting.   One   person   should  be   the           appreciate  such  a good question and

  designated main  speaker.  If  you  need            you will research it  and contact them

  assistance,   please    ask    a    Steering            with the answer.

  Committee member to  accompany  you

  to the meeting.                                                 * Do not  get  into  NAIS  in depth  or  be

                                                                              negative. The Freedom to Farm Act is

* Take copies of  the Freedom to Farm               a positive  act basically giving  animal

   Act   for   each   person  attending  the             and plant producers a bill of rights.

  meeting   and   one  for   the   General

  Assembly member.                                           * Do not wear a hat or sunglasses.

 

* Remember that  time is  valuable. Get  to      * Do not chew gum or tobacco.

  the   point  and   stay    focused.   Explain 

  the “short  and  sweet”  of   the  Freedom      * Do not get into the New World Order,   

  to Farm Act and invite questions. Assume         911, partisan politics, etc.

  the   General    Assembly   member   does

  not know which end of a cow one milks.        * Do not wear cologne or perfume. Some

                                                                             people react adversely  to it.

* Be  complimentary   to  the    General         

   Assembly  member.  Thank  them  for          * Do not discuss other bills.

   their time. After the meeting, send a

  thank you letter.

 

* Try  to  get  a  commitment   from  the

   General Assembly  member  for  their

   support of the Freedom to Farm Act.                                                                               

* Be neat and clean.

                                                                    

x

 

x

 

x

 

x

 

x

 

x

 

x

 

x

 

x

 

x