What are the vets saying?
     
MEMBERSHIP FORM and PETITION

USDA HANDBOOK addresses Farmers as Uneducated

What is DEPOPULATION?

Points For Opposing Animal ID

Export Myths and Fairytales

NASS Survey Information

ARAPA Statement to the Senate Ag Committee

Codex Alimentarius

FORCED NAIS

Sound Science Killing Us

What Can I Do?

2006 ARKANSAS COOPERATIVE AGREEMENT WITH USDA

What are the vets saying?

BREAKING NEWS

Congressmen Speak Out

International Entanglements

What is COOL?

Mad Cow Madness

CONTACT US

By-Laws

2007 ARKANSAS COOPERATIVE AGREEMENT WITH USDA

Important Links

ARKANSAS ANIMAL PRODUCERS ASSOCIATION

Photos From Conway Meeting

FREEDOM TO FARM ACT UPDATES

ALERTS

Corporate Hostile Takeover

What About The Amish?

CONSTITUTION RULES

How do Packers fit in?

The Real Reason for Animal ID

AUSSIE ANIMAL ID IMPACT STUDY

Endangered Property Rights

Organic & Grassfed Growers Also Affected

DATABASES - How Safe Are They?

Wake Up, Farmers!

USDA/APHIS NAIS DOCUMENTS

CAPTIVE ANIMAL FACTORY FARMING

Technology Behind NAIS

AUSSIE RANCHER SPEAKS OUT

NIAA Conference Reports

Pushing Us Off Our Farms

Ag Lawyer Responds to the NAIS

NAIS SUMMARY

INDUSTRIALIZED FARMING

Uncle Sam Wants YOUR Animals!

HORSE TIMELINE FOR NAIS INCLUSION

NAIS DRAFT STRATEGIC PLAN

What is REAL ID?

"CREATIVE" SIGN-UPS BY THE GOVERNMENT

Animal ID Problems in Other Countries

Farm Bureau Connection

NAIS Threatens Rare Breeds

RFID Tags - Good, Bad & Ugly

R-CALF USA Fights NAIS

Retired Army Colonel Rebuts NAIS

Equine Species Working Group Contacts

BRUCE KNIGHT'S SPEECH

INFO ON USDA'S NEW "USER'S GUIDE"

SCRAPIE ID for Goats/Sheep & the NAIS

NAIS ID Terminology

GETTING OUT OF THE NAIS

The PLUM ISLAND CONNECTION

The Plan is AGENDA 21

4-H, FFA Targeted at Fairs

MICROCHIPS Cause CANCER

Leon's Story - Chipped Dog Died From Cancer

TRACKING ROGUE CHICKENS

Protection From Terrorist Livestock

NAIS NEWS in OTHER STATES

Truth about FOOD CONTAMINATION

TRUTH about Foot & Mouth Vaccines

MICROCHIP PROBLEMS IN DUTCH HORSES

What is DELPHI TECHNIQUE

NEW INFORMATION ON EQUINES

2005 ARKANSAS COOPERATIVE AGREEMENT WITH USDA/APHIS

CONTACT GENERAL ASSEMBLY MEMBERS FOR ARKANSAS

Bird Flu Fowl Play

USDA, INCORPORATED

ECONOMIC IMPACT ON HORSE OWNERS

 

THE RACE IS ON FOR US TO DEFEAT THE NAIS!

Not All Veterinarians are *for* the NAIS!

HAVE YOU ASKED *YOUR* VET HOW HE FEELS ABOUT THE NAIS? YOU MIGHT BE SURPRISED BY HIS ANSWER!

AT LEAST THREE LARGE ANIMAL/EQUINE VETS IN ARKANSAS HAVE INDICATED THAT THEY WILL NOT CONTINUE TO PRACTICE OR TREAT EQUINES/LARGE ANIMALS IF THE NAIS GOES INTO AFFECT, AND A FOURTH IS INDICATING HE MAY DO THE SAME - THEY ARE CITING THE EXTREME LIABILITIES THAT WILL COME WITH THE NAIS. THE U.S. ALREADY HAS A CRITICAL SHORTAGE OF LARGE ANIMAL VETS - WHAT WILL HAPPEN IF WE LOSE EVEN JUST 20% DUE TO THE NAIS? CAN YOU AFFORD TO LOSE YOUR VET?

Remember those international treaties we've been talking about? Read what an Australian veterinarian has to say about one of them....

CAN WTO'S SANITARY & PHYTOSANITARY STANDARDS (SPS) GUT AUSTRALIA'S QUARANTINE?

Vet’s View. by Lee McNicholl B.V.Sc. (Uni of Q) M.V.Sc. (Uni of California)

CURRENT GLOBAL SPS PROTOCOLS AROSE FROM THE 1994 WORLD TRADE ORGANIZATION'S URUGUAY ROUND OF MULTI-LATERAL TRADE NEGOTIATIONS. What are they and what is their purpose?

The 1994 Agreement on Sanitary and Phytosanitary Standards was designed to clarify and standardize the TRADE RULES taken to protect human, animal and plant health and safety. It was PART OF A WIDER AGREEMENT ON AGRIGULTURAL TRADE LIBERALIZATION and obviously designed to prevent countries unilaterally creating artificial trade barriers based on "non-scientific" health standards. One might say this is fair and reasonable so far, and so what is there to worry about?

The lynch pin of this entire system is the IMPORT RISK ASSESSMENT (IRA) procedure and the protocols that should be applied by a WTO member country when another member applies to export animal or plant material to that importing member.

As outlined latter, the process has enough safeguards to provide acceptable levels of protection IF the "free trade" zealots in Governments and their bureaucracies CAN BE CONTROLLED. They must be prevented at all costs from using watered down SPS rules as a bargaining chip to FACILITATE THEIR WIDER "FREE TRADE" AGENDAS. 

THE INTERNATIONAL BODY, WHICH SET THE SPS "RULES", IS LOCATED IN FRANCE AND IS KNOWN AS THE O.I.E. It is their "rules" which are used when disputes are brought before the WTO by litigants alleging the use of "non scientific" import trade barriers. The O.I.E. uses the following definitions.

Principles of risk management
RISH ASSESSMENT IS THE PROCESS OF DECIDING UPON AND IMPLEMENTING MEASURES TO ACHIEVE THE MEMBER COUNTRY'S APPROPRIATE LEVEL OF PROTECTION, WHILST AT THE SAME TIME ENSURING THAT NEGATIVE EFFECTS ON TRADE ARE MINIMISED. The objective is to manage risk appropriately to ensure that a balance is achieved between a country's desire to minimise the likelihood or frequency of disease incursions and their consequences and its desire to import commodities and fulfill its obligations under international trade agreements.

The international standards of the OIE are the preferred choice of sanitary measures for risk management. The application of these sanitary measures should be in accordance with the intentions in the standards.
3. Acceptable Risk means a risk level judged by each member country to be compatible with the protection of animal and public health within its borders.

The patently obvious consequence of the O.I.E. "rules" which are really only unenforceable operational guidelines, is that individual members can truly maintain their own reasonable quarantine standards. It is pointed out elsewhere, that even where a dissenting minority scientific opinion opposes a certain import by invoking the precautionary principle, it is reasonable for that country to reject the controversial importation.

This lays bare the current hypocrisy of our Commonwealth Govt. when it claims it has its hands tied and must oppose the very justified attempts by Australian Pork Limited to prevent pig meat imports from countries infected with PMWS. It also makes a mockery of their current behind the scenes attempts to allow beef imports from BSE infected countries. Alarmingly, their recent incredibly lax handling of meat imports from Brazil also really highlights just how much our current Coalition Govt. is prepared to trade away our traditionally high quarantine standards which the O.I.E agrees is Australia’s inalienable right to maintain.

A country's hard earned disease free status should never be traded away. Australia has eradicated FMD {three times, Pleuropneumonia, TB and Brucellosis as a result of the determination, blood ,sweat and tears of our veterinarians of the day. I was one of the many. It would be an insult to their memory and commitment if contemporary veterinary bureaucrats traded away their legacy. I feel very strongly on this issue and so should you.

http://www.austbeef.com.au/Content.asp?regID=15403&id=74430

SEE THE PICTURE? IT IS INTERNATIONAL ENTITIES (WITH GLOBAL COPORATE INVOLVEMENT) THAT ARE DICTACTING TO AMERICANS HOW WE ARE GOING TO OWN, USE AND MARKET OUR OWN ANIMALS. IN AMERICA, THIS IS BEING CALLED THE NATIONAL ANIMAL IDENTIFICATION SYSTEM, BUT IT IS COMING FROM THOSE 1994 TREATIES AND THEY ARE ATTEMPTING TO OVERRIDE OUR CONSTITUTION AND NATIONAL SOVEREIGNTY. PLEASE NOTE THAT PROTECTING US FROM DISEASE OR FROM TERRORISTS IS NOT MENTIONED IN THESE TREATIES!! IT'S *ALL* ABOUT *TRADE* AND CORPORATIONS MAKING BILLIONS OF DOLLARS!!!

American veterinarian Melvin T. Massey, DVM, wrote the following about the dangers of implanting RFID chips in horses:

"Horses have thinner skin more loosely attached than other animals. More prone to swelling. More problems with any irritant under the skin. Things migrate easier. Horses - esp hot blooded breeds have lots of blood vessels in the skin. The cannula used to insert a chip is like a very large needle. So large the end is like a blade. Do a thousand horses and you will have some that will get a hematoma from cutting a vessel. The loose subQ tissue will allow things to move. Some will get a irritation which may swell or cause a chance of a sarcoid developing. A virus is involved but is not the only factor. Foreign material may set it up. Thieves can cut a chip out and/or put one from a dead horse in. Freezebrands can not be changed easily or hidden."

Dr. Massey also wrote the following to the American Horse Council:

Here is what I wrote them -------"I am a retired Equine Veterinarian and still breed a few horses. Because of migration -infections- increased risk of sarcoids I will not want to have microchips in my horses. Chips can be altered - removed - put in other horses. Freezebranding should be allowed to identify a horse. People who trail ride should not have to file reports or risk being a criminal over redundant routine paperwork. It appears to me that the AHC is trying to please Gov-Ag more than trying to allow horse owners to enjoy and use/care for their horses. I own TBs /Paints / QHs -- I will ask each Registry I pay dues to leave the AHC - Melvin T Massey D.V.M"

RECENT COMMENT BY DR. MASSEY, DVM:

The fees need to collected on a per head basis at sale for slaughter. It is not fair to charge fees for animals used only as pets or home consumption. 4H-FFA kids should not be charged the same as large producers. The rules are not productive to help a local agricultural  economy. The TAHC rules will hurt local feed stores --Veterinarians -and other suppliers to animal agriculture because many people will just give up in disgust over injustice and intrusions into their business. The rules are being promoted by large agribusiness for their own interests. The Scrapie Program is all that is needed for sheep and goats. Registered horses are already identified and a data base is already in place. Most have DNA on file. As for as BSE -there are any things not being done. Blood - Plate waste - Chicken litter is still being fed to ruminants. These rules would help prevent BSE in Texas --trace back is
needed after there is already been a problem.  Texas needs to promote local and state agriculture-- your proposed rules will drive people out of agriculture and leave Texas more vulnerable to an attack on the food supply if it becomes more concentrated and dependant on long distance hauling and shipping.    
M.T.Massey D.V.M.      TAMU vet Class of 1964

OKLAHOMA VET LAYS IT ON THE LINE

This upcoming election is one of the most important in our life time. If we vote for supporters of Big Agriculture (Monsanto, Tyson, Cargill etc.) we will enter into the era of corporate Fascism. These companies have the money and the power to get the USDA, FDA and some of our elected officials to do what is in their best interests (not
the public's). Case in point: the National Animal Identification System. This program (NOT A LAW) will benefit the corporate enitities and SNUFF out the small farmer, ranchers, hobby breeders, owners of one or two animals. It includes even if you own only one of horse, goat, sheep, ratite, camilid, poultry, fish, crawdad, anything that can be considered food and will probably be expanded to include our pets. USDA wants this program to become manditory by Jan.1, 2009 with all premises registered including a GPS address, all animals microchiped or
tagged with RFIDs and the owners reporting if an animal leaves the premises for any reason within 24 hrs. There will be fines for non-compliance of up to $1000./day and unwarranted inspections.

They say they want to secure the food supply from disease and terrorists. With everyone in the data base (you know how safe they are? Right!) the terrorists will know exactly where to go. The disease angle- all states and the Feds have regulations now that trace back disease very efficiently, WHY burden the people with more regulations, taxes and fees for another bureaucracy?

To find out more please come to Chupps Auction, Sat. Aug. 5th on Hwy 412 and NS 426. This location is about half way between Inola and Chouteau. Also, the GRANNY WARRIORS will be there with all the program details from the Standards to the Strategic Plan for you to read for yourselves, and articles showing how similar, but not as inclusive programs, have affected other countries.

If you like to raise or grow your own food, buy from local farmers or food coops or eat organic or just EAT period you need to know how NAIS will affect how and what you will be able to buy and how much you will spend. Not only will food prices rise without the competition, but the quality will go down severely, affecting your health. Do you know you now eat codfish genes in strawberries, bacteria genes in corn, formaldehyde and a recombinate growth hormone in your milk? Do you want more of this in our food supply? If the answer is NO, then who you elect as our state and federal representatives will determine if our children and grandchildren will be saddled with this program or if they will have the freedom to raise their own food, eat organic or just buy from the grocery store.

Please become informed and if you agree with me, then fight for our Constitutional rights that we will be losing under this program.

Georg Ann Mundis, DVM

 

http://www.grandforks.com/mld/grandforks/business/14785739.htm


MEAT INDUSTRY: VET CALLS ANIMAL ID PROPOSALS OVERKILL

N.D. Board of Animal Health scientist says existing systems could track cattle more efficiently

By Mikkel Pates

Agweek Staff Writer

The North Dakota Board of Animal Health veterinarian is developing a proposal for a "hybrid" animal trace-back system that relies more on existing systems - cattle branding and paper trails on livestock transactions - and not switching immediately to expensive individual electronic tracking for all animals.

The federal government is in the process of implementing a National Animal Identification System. The system is voluntary but could become mandatory. It would be based on a national registration of farms and feedlots, coupled with electronic tags for each animal.

"Maybe we could come up with a hybrid system that recognizes the useful information associated with brand laws and couple that with (electronic) tracking data," says Jim Clement, animal identification coordinator for the board.

"We have a system that actually works quite well because it is associated with title and real dollars," he says.

Clement says a system he envisions would be based on what he calls a "market transaction certificate," a hybrid between a brand certificate and health certificate.

Congress has directed the U.S. Department of Agriculture's Animal and Plant Health Inspection Service to announce proposed rule making by October, or face losing funding for the program.

Clement is in the process of writing a "white paper" on the topic. He's discussed it with the North Dakota Stockmen's Association and will take it to the Board of Animal Health's June 21 quarterly meeting. The state board could adopt it as a formal recommendation to the USDA.

The draft includes protocols under a variety of real-world scenarios.

In the most recent draft of his paper, Clement argues that if it's really true that the primary goal of the program is for 48-hour trace-back for animal and human disease protection, then the animal health issue is better covered by existing systems - brands in 17 Western states, business invoices and veterinary certificates.

That should be sufficient - probably more effective than electronic tags - for tracking animals that will grow to maturity in two years and be slaughtered. A more complex electronic system would be beneficial for the breeding cattle, for example, that often have a life span of six to 10 years, he says.

Clement notes that ranchers already pay for up-front costs for branding and would continue to do so.

Even when a brand issued in one state is the same or similar to a brand in a neighboring state, it's still possible to track the herd of origin if the government implements premises identification numbers for each farm, which is the first step in the animal ID system.

Clement says the three ways cattle change owners - auctions, "country weigh associations" and direct buy-sell agreements on the farm - all require brand inspections. They also require veterinary health certificates if the animals are moving interstate.

He says if the threat is a disease outbreak, the existing system works well enough because quarantines and depopulation would involve "entire market group cohorts" anyway, so individual information would be overkill. Branding systems already identify these groups.

A large part of the U.S. cattle industry already is "governed by brand laws that have functional systems that already trace group movements and tracking systems that will deal with FMD (foot and mouth disease) more efficiently than a system that could be under construction for many years to come," Clement writes.

Clement says the current animal ID thinking is impractical. "It is assumed that if we just 'electrify' the cattle industry, animal disease investigators will be able to sit in their control room and with the stroke of a key create an electronic report that contains all movement data from the farm or ranch of origin to the current or final destination. Even if this were logistically possible, what would it cost?" Clement writes

 

BROWNFIELD AGRICULTURE TODAY, WED., JULY 5, 2006 NEWS BRIEFS

VET SHORTAGE MAY IMPACT FOOD SAFETY


"A recently published study reveals fewer veterinary students are choosing careers within the food supply sector. The research suggests that although the United States livestock and meat industries currently have one of the world's best health and safety records, that status may be threatened in the future as a result of the projected shortage of food supply animal veterinarians.

The research, conducted by the Food Supply Veterinary Medicine Coalition, predicts demand of food animal veterinarians to increase 12 to 13 percent over the next decade, while there is an anticipated shortfall of these specialty veterinarians of four to five percent per year. The study found students decisions to avoid the food supply industry are affected by some veterinary colleges failing to place enough emphasis on these careers, students lacking exposure to the food industry and common misconceptions about rural life." 

*******************************************************************************************

The New York Times
February 6, 2007
A New Problem for Farmers: Few Veterinarians
By PAM BELLUCK

GORHAM, Me. - Rainbow had the bad luck to try to have a baby on a Thursday.

Thursday was her doctor's day off, and there was no one else for miles who could handle a complicated breech birth, not when the mother was a Holstein cow.

"Had the vet been here, we could have done a C-section and she could have lived through it fine," said Becki Benson, the owner, with her husband, Eddie, of Rainbow and 150 other dairy cows.

Instead, "I worked on her till I was just exhausted," Mr. Benson said. "But I ended up having to take the cow to a butcher shop, where she got processed for hamburger."

These days, the Bensons' veterinarian is pretty much the only cow doctor in a 1,300-square-mile swath of Maine, and one of only about 30 large-animal veterinarians left in the entire state.

And across the country, veterinarians who care for the animals that provide the United States with food are in increasingly short supply.

For one, there is generally more money to be made caring for cats and dogs. And with fewer students from farm backgrounds, fewer gravitate to rural jobs, especially if a spouse needs work, too. Large-animal care can be
tough, even dangerous - think of maneuvering in frigid weather around 1,000-pound cows in manure-filled pens. And more veterinarians are women, generally less inclined toward large animals.

******
Since 1990, the number of veterinarians focusing on large animals has dropped to fewer than 4,500 from nearly 6,000, according to the American Veterinary Medical Association, which said those doctors now made up less
than 10 percent of private-practice veterinarians. A recent study predicted that by 2016, 4 out of every 100 food-animal veterinary jobs would go unfilled.
*****
"We look at it as a crisis," said Dr. Roger Mahr, the association's president, who cited serious consequences not only for the well-being of farmers and animals, but also potentially for food safety and the impact of non-native diseases like bird flu.

"Of all the emerging diseases in people in the last 25 years, 75 percent of those were transmitted from animals," Dr. Mahr said. "Veterinarians are the ones to identify those diseases in animals first."

Pressed to address the problem, Congress enacted a law in 2004 offering to repay the student loans of veterinarians working in underserved areas, but it has received little financing.

States are jumping in, with loan repayment or grant programs under way or proposed in Kansas, Maine, Missouri, North Dakota, Texas and elsewhere.

In Iowa, students at the state's veterinary school formed Vsmart, which barnstorms county fairs and 4-H meetings to entice teenagers to become rural veterinarians.

And in Oklahoma, State Representative Don Armes, Republican of Faxon, has introduced a bill offering tax breaks to large-animal veterinarians. Mr. Armes, a cattleman, knows the shortage firsthand, especially after one Friday last summer when a heifer struggled to deliver a large calf.

"I called six different veterinarians and could not get any of them," Mr. Armes said. "We lost the calf. Almost lost the heifer."

The dearth of food-animal veterinarians (the shortage is not as critical for horses) reflects seismic shifts in farming, veterinary medicine, the economy and American culture.

Money is critical when veterinary students graduate $100,000 in debt. While some say salaries can be the same, no matter the animal size, many say small-animal practices are more profitable, allowing for dozens of clinic
appointments daily instead of requiring trips of long distances between farms and ranches. And dog or cat owners more often pay for expensive surgery and treatment.

"For Fifi the family dog, you'll spend $1,500 or $2,000," Mr. Armes said. "That old cow - at some point economics kick in and you say if she's going to cost $1,500, I can buy two cows for that, so I should have shot her."

Tembra Gatlin, 27, who was reared on an Oklahoma ranch, started veterinary school "large animal all the way," she said.

She changed her mind after doing "a C-section on a cow and it's 50 bucks," Ms. Gatlin said. "Do a C-section on a Chihuahua and you get $300. It's the money. I hate to say that."

*****
A study by the American Veterinary Medical Association found the median starting salary of large-animal veterinarians to be $60,500, $11,000 less than that of small-animal veterinarians. For veterinarians practicing 25
years, the gap was even wider: $98,500 for large-animal practitioners, $122, 500 for small.
*****
In Maine, the closing of about 250 dairy farms since 1993 makes it harder to attract new veterinarians and leaves remaining farm doctors overstretched.

"If you can't get a vet or it's so expensive because they have to travel such a distance, farmers end up just dealing with it themselves, and in a lot of cases that's not a good idea," said Dr. Donald Hoenig, Maine's state
veterinarian.

Timothy Leary, a farmer in Saco, Me., nearly lost a cow with a prolapsed uterus when no veterinarian was available. "You either eat your mistakes or you bury them, if you literally can't get anyone," Mr. Leary said. Even the
small-animal clinic where Mr. Leary's wife is a technician could not help him.

Dr. Dennis M. Brewster treated animals of the Bensons' and other farmers until a few years ago, when he felt forced to switch to dogs and cats because he could not find another large-animal doctor to help cover
emergencies.

"I just didn't want to face all of these dear people and tell them that I could not come to their farm for an emergency, and then when I showed up have them say, 'You know that prize cow you didn't come for died,' " he
said. "Now, some farmers have had to make hard decisions. They've had to kill cows for things that we used to fix."

The Bensons, who raise valuable cows for breeding as well as milking, now shoulder many veterinary responsibilities, giving cows antibiotics for mastitis and intravenous calcium for milk fever.

Their current veterinarian, Dr. Becky Myers, 52, worked for years round the clock.

"Half killed myself," Dr. Myers said. Back problems developed. A cow broke her hand.

When she had a baby son, farmers with sick animals "would be pushing the stroller around while I was pushing a cow's uterus back in. I used to call people in the middle of the night to come over and watch him when a farmer
called. He gave me the nickname Mommy Moo."

Three times she managed to hire partners, but they either left Maine or large-animal care. In 2003, Dr. Myers said, she scaled back to four 10-hour days, "which people here consider to be part time."

Before reducing her hours, Dr. Myers held a training session for farmers, providing a detailed manual with tips on giving cows anesthesia and pumping their stomachs. Her schedule is still packed. One recent day was spent
vaccinating calves for brucellosis, helping a sheep give birth, poking into a heifer's uterus to determine pregnancy, inserting magnets into a sick cow to attract metal fragments it might have swallowed and examining an arthritic goat whose owner had driven 70 miles because no doctor was nearer.

But with so few counterparts - one of the closest is Doc Cooper, 80, an hour's drive north - "people get stuck and I feel really bad about it," she said. "It was one of those decisions - is my health and my family life more
important or less important than somebody's cow?"

Dr. Myers once visited the Bensons every 10 days; now it is once a month. They understand her need to cut back. Still, just in the last month, one cow, Darling, had a foot problem the Bensons could not diagnose. Another, Karissa, had mastitis, but the Bensons initially misdiagnosed the strain and gave the wrong antibiotic, delaying her recovery and milk production.

And Alpha, a cow worth thousands of dollars, became weak and feverish after miscarrying twins, unfortunately on a weekend. When the Bensons tried moving her to a comfortable pen, she literally dropped dead.

"The fact that there's nothing you can do, you accept it as a business expense now," Mr. Benson said. "You didn't used to. If you have livestock, sooner or later you're going to have deadstock."

THIS IS WHAT WE HAVE BEEN TRYING TO TELL PEOPLE FOR MONTHS - THAT THE NAIS IS GOING TO ADD TO THE ALREADY CRITICAL SHORTAGE OF LARGE ANIMAL/EQUINE VETS IN OUR NATION. EVEN IF YOU GO ALONG WITH THE NAIS, WHAT WILL YOU DO IF YOU CANNOT FIND A VET THAT WILL TREAT YOUR HORSES/COWS/ETC.?

************************************************************************

OUR VETERINARIANS ARE UNDER INTERNATIONAL CONTROL 

Here is evidence of yet another animal health reporting system REQUIRED by a world trade organization type organization. Apparently it is a mandate to the STATE VETERINARIANS. Note the "foreign entanglements" provisions. Note that this "voluntary monitoring" is "required."

Col. Randy Givens (retired)

NATIONAL ANIMAL HEALTH REPORTING SYSTEM (NAHRS)

June 20, 2006 (Volume 71, Number 118)]
[Notices]              
[Page 35408]

DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE

Submission for OMB Review; Comment Request

June 15, 2006.
    The Department of Agriculture has submitted the following information collection REQUIREMENT(s) to OMB for review and clearance under the Paperwork Reduction Act of 1995, Public Law 104-13. (NOTE THIS PART) Comments regarding (a) whether the collection of information is necessary for the proper performance of the functions of the agency, including whether the information will have practical utility; (b) the accuracy of the agency's estimate of burden including the validity of the methodology and assumptions used; (c) ways to enhance the quality, utility and clarity of the information to be collected; (d) ways to minimize the burden of the collection of information on those who are to respond, including through the use of appropriate automated, electronic, mechanical or other technological collection techniques or other forms of information technology should be addressed to: Dest Officer for Agriculture, Office of Information and Regulatory Affairs, Office of Management and Budget (OMB), OIRA Submission@OMB.EOP.GOV or fax (202) 395-5806 and to Department Clearance Office, USDA, OCIO, Mail Stop 7602, Washington, D.C. 20250-7602. Comments regarding these information collections are best assured of having their full effect if received within 30 days of this notification. Copies of the submission(s) may be obtained by calling (202) 720-8958.

An agency may not conduct or sponsor a collection of information unless the collection of information displays a currently valid OMB control number and the agency informs potential persons who are to respond to the collection of information that such persons are not required to respond to the collection of information unless it displays
a currently valid OMB control number.

Animal and Plant Health Inspection Service

    Title: National Animal Health Reporting System (NAHRS).
    OMB Control Number: 0579-NEW.
    Summary of Collection: The National Animal Health Reporting System (NAHRS) was developed through a cooperative effort between the United States Animal Health Association, the American Association of
Veterinary Laboratory Diagnosticians, and the Animal and Plant Health Inspection Service (APHIS). NAHRS provides an ongoing national measure of the health status of the nation's livestock. The National Center for Animal Health Surveillance involvement in this voluntary monitoring activity is to facilitate standardization of the data throughout the United States and provide a central point for national collection. The evolving international trade arena and increased competition have heightened the need to have accurate, timely information to maintain and increase U.S. animal agriculture's overseas market share.
   

Need and Use of the Information: The objective of the NAHRS is to collect data needed to report the presence of confirmed clinical disease in commercial livestock, poultry, and aquaculture species in the U.S. These reports are required for membership by the Office International des Epizooties, and to meet international trade reporting
requirements for animal health. ON A MONTHLY BASIS STATE VETERINARIANS IN EACH OF THE 50 STATES ARE ASKED TO COMPLETE THE NAHRS REPORTABLE DISEASE LIST FORM. The form collects qualitative data from reporting States on the confirmed presence or absence of diseases, but does not collect or report the number of cases.
    Description of Respondents: State, Local, or Tribal Government.
    Number of Respondents: 50.
    Frequency of Responses: Reporting: Annually.
    Total Burden Hours: 2,400.

 


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